Friday, July 24, 2009

Best. Column. Evah!

Never underestimate the power of Rule 2:
Last week, I called the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to press ["science czar" John] Holdren on his views about forced abortions and mass sterilizations; his purported disavowal of Ecoscience, the 1977 book he co-authored with population control zealots Paul and Anne Ehrlich; and his continued embrace of forced-abortion advocate and eugenics guru Harrison Brown, whom he credits with inspiring him to become a scientist.
After investigative bloggers and this column reprinted extensive excerpts from Ecoscience, which mused openly about putting sterilants in the water supply to make women infertile and engineering society by taking away babies from undesirables and subjecting them to government-mandated abortions, the White House issued a statement from Holdren last week denying he embraced those proposals. The Ehrlichs challenged critics to read their and Holdren’s more recent research and works. . . .
In 2007, he addressed the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference. Holdren served as AAAS president; the organization posted his full slide presentation on its website.
In the opening slide, Holdren admitted that his “preoccupation” with apocalyptic matters such as “the rates at which people breed” was a lifelong obsession spurred by scientist Harrison Brown’s work. . . .
Read the whole thing. This is a healthy competition among columnists that should be encouraged. Ann Coulter and Mark Steyn have linked me from their sites in the past, but they ain't been linking me lately. Despite the lack of recent linkage, however, Ann Coulter's take on the "health care crisis" is brilliant:
Insurance plans that force everyone in the plan to pay for everyone else's Viagra and anti-anxiety pills are already completely unfair to people who rarely go to the doctor. It's like being forced to share gas bills with a long-haul trucker or a restaurant bill with Michael Moore. On the other hand, it's a great deal for any lonely hypochondriacs in the plan.
Read the whole thing, because she's exactly right. I hate going to the doctor. I hate taking medicine. If my aortic valve blows out tomorrow, don't mourn this as "tragic" or "senseless." Such a mercifully sudden departure from this vale of tears would to me be infinitely preferable to the ordeal of filing out an insurance form and spending 15 minutes in the waiting room of a doctor's office, to say nothing of idling around a drugstore while I wait for the pharmacist to fill my prescription.

Think about this: The percentage of your life spent leafing through a three-week-old copy of Newsweek in a doctor's waiting room -- is that really "life" at all? We're all gonna die some day, but some of us actually try to live first. And that otherwise healthy idiot who chooses to waste his life shuttling back and forth between MRI screenings, cardiac stress tests, colonoscopy appointments and the Rite Aid prescription counter isn't practicing "preventive medicine." He's just running up the bill at someone else's expense, like when I go to a Reason happy hour and tell the bartender to put everything on Matt Welch's tab.

Have you ever known one of those "lonely hypochondriacs" of whom Coulter speaks? Talk about your persuasive arguments for euthanasia! Feeble neurasthenics who run to the doctor every time they get an ache or pain should be sent directly to the Soylent Green factory.

Honestly, I knew America was doomed when they announced that Medicare would pay for Viagra. Oh, just great: The Federal Bureau of Boners.

Patriots died of frostbite at Valley Forge so that we could tax nurses to pay for their geriatric patients to get aroused. Ask the staff at the "retirement center" about the septuagenarian whose idea of a joke is to take his little blue pill and hit the nurse-call button.
Nurse: "Is there a problem?"
Patient: (Exposing himself) "Yes, ma'am, I had this sudden swelling . . ."
But why bring John McCain into this? My point was that health care is not a right, no matter what Ted Kennedy says. "Health care as a right, not a privilege," says Ted. (Mary Jo Kopechne could not be reached for comment.)

My real point, however, is this: Ann Coulter should link me more often. But did I really need to say that?

UPDATE: Speaking of The Rules, how about ObamaCare bashing from a sexy redhead in her underwear? Say what you will about Rule 5, if sexy chicks can save us from socialized medicine . . . well, it's a sacrifice we'll have to make. Freedom is never free!


  1. I'll admit, the idea of forced sterilization scares the hell out of me.

  2. Do you know why Viagra is prescribed to men at nursing homes?

    So they don't roll out of bed.